Creating Slide Presentations Using InDesign and Acrobat

One thing that always surprises me when I sit in an Adobe conference room or attend a conference session led by an Adobe employee is watching a Powerpoint presentation on an LCD. I know that creating presentations is handy in PowerPoint, but after preparing presentations in layout programs and converting to PDF for more that 15 years, I find that I can whiz through the creation stage about as fast using InDesign and Acrobat as I can using PowerPoint.

I enjoy much more creative freedom using Adobe InDesign than I have using PowerPoint. With features in InDesign such as Table and Object Styles, my creation steps are reduced to a fraction of the time I once spent assembling a presentation. Furthermore, with a little refinement of some tips offered by Dallas based designer Bryan Tamayo in his article Thinking Outside the Page and reported here on Acrobat Users, I can add a little more design freedom to my slide presentations.

Take Figure 1 as an example. I find that adding icons and page numbers off the document page provide me a little more real estate for adding bullet points on the document pages.

Figure 1

Let’s take a look at the circle on the lower right side of Figure 1. To create a similar design, I start on a Master Page in Adobe InDesign. The circle is off the page and the page number is reported inside the circle. When you place objects off the page, you need to have the center-point of the object within the page boundary. To get the circle to appear off the page, we need to finesse it a little.

Draw an object in InDesign or import an object from Adobe Illustrator on to a Master Page in Adobe InDesign. For the circle in Figure 1 I add a little stroke (just a 0-point stroke with about a 1-point length) offset to the left. All you need is a dot offset from the object. When I select the objects you something similar to the selection shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2

With both objects selected I choose Object > Group. When the objects are grouped the bounding box changes to what you see in Figure 3. You can see that the center-point has now changed for the circle object and when I place the graphic off the page, I can keep the center-point within the page boundary (this is essential) while the circle is completely moved off the page.

Figure 3

My next step is to add a page number to the center of the circle. I draw a text box and right align (Command/Ctrl + Shift + R) my text. I can choose my font colors and styles from the Type menu to format the font. After formatting the font, I choose Type > Insert Special Character > Markers > Current Page Number or press Option/Alt + Shift + Command/Ctrl+N to set the text to an auto page number.

Next, move the page number to the position you want to appear on the object. Select both objects as you see in Figure 4.

Figure 4

With the objects selected, again visit the Object menu and choose Group. The bounding box and page position are shown in Figure 5. Notice that the center-point falls well within the page boundary.

Figure 5

The last step to finish off this graphic is to convert the object (now grouped as a single object) to a button and set the button action. With the object selected, choose Object > Interactive > Convert to Button.

The Button Options dialog box opens. Click the Behaviors tab and choose a Behavior from the drop down menu. For my button I want to use the button action to open the next page in my slide presentation. Therefore I choose Go To Next Page.

As a last step, click the Add button so the behavior appears in the left pane as you see in Figure 6. Then click OK.

Figure 6

If you want to change the button action to an action type that doesn’t appear in InDesign, you can do so by double clicking the button with the Select Object tool in Acrobat and click the Actions tab when the Button Properties dialog box opens. In the Actions tab you can assign any action Acrobat provides you by making selections from the Select Action drop down menu.

When you convert to PDF from InDesign, make sure you check the box for Interactive Elements in the Options area of the Export Adobe PDF dialog box (shown in Figure 7) you get when you choose File > Export.

Figure 7

Some other advantages you have in using InDesign as your original authoring program for slide presentations include converting to Adobe PDF Layers, using Table and Object styles to facilitate your design creations, and using the marvelous style sheets that only InDesign provides. Once in Acrobat you can import video and sound, add page transitions, link to other PDFs and external application documents, and of course all the other functions and features Acrobat provides you.

In regard to Adobe PDF Layers, if you happen to create multi-lingual documents you can add all graphics to a background layer in InDesign and add layers for different language versions. When you convert to PDF with the Create Acrobat Layers checkbox enabled in the Export Adobe PDF dialog box, your InDesign layers are viewed as separate layers in Acrobat/Reader. When making presentations in a different language you can toggle the layer view to the language you’re addressing.

An argument many PowerPoint users may advocate is that it’s easier to modify a presentation in PowerPoint than InDesign and recreating a PDF. I don’t see using InDesign as a problem for modifying my presentations. At times I’ve had to revise an entire presentation after adding all my links in the Acrobat PDF. Assuming the links remain the same, all I had to do is convert a second document to PDF and use the Document > Replace Pages command to replace the background pages while retaining my button links in the new PDF.

What about handouts and speaker notes? Admittedly, creating handouts and speaker notes is much easier in PowerPoint than InDesign. However, you can create these items in InDesign such as you see in Figure 8.

Just create a frame and design elements on a master page and place your PDF slide presentation using the Show Import Options item in the Place dialog box when placing your slide show on the document pages. Unfortunately, you need to place each page individually making it a much more timely task than using PowerPoint —but placing PDF pages in InDesign is a matter of just loading the cursor and scrolling pages to place the PDF pages on new InDesign pages. I find the trade-off for taking a little more time with an InDesign authored presentation not to be a hassle when I need speaker notes or handouts.

Figure 8

If I’m speaking on Adobe Acrobat and PDF, then my PDF presentations provide me much more credibility with my audience.

Source: www.acrobatusers.com

Making An Effective Poster Presentation

Poster printing presentations are very much an integral part of any research undertaking because you need to communicate to your colleagues the result of what you have done and interact with them.

In any professional association meetings, poster printing sessions have become very significant with its purpose of providing the presenters a way to connect with their audience and relay their research findings. This has become such a way of life in any organizational meetings in disciplines of the sciences that poster printing sessions are made more often than the presentation of any research paper. It seems that the science community has become more acceptable of making research studies more flexible and easier to understand.

However, a poster printing presentation is certainly neither a thesis nor a dissertation. As much as you want to put everything you have to say in your poster printing presentation, space is limited to such that it makes for a much better viewing than reading. Keep in mind that viewers of your poster printing presentation would be averse to lengthy reading, and would only be inspecting what you have done. Your lengthy explanation would be much better off in a journal or thesis that you can provide after.

Therefore, keeping it simple without sacrificing the information contained within would get you more viewers than any other kind of poster printing presentation. Here are a few suggestions that can help you come up with an effective poster printing presentation for your research:

1 - Your title should be brief and descriptive. With just one look, your viewers should be able to deduce what you have in store for them. Your title has a very solid role to play in your poster printing presentation. It’s either your title grab your viewers’ attention or they simply decide that they are not interested.

2 - A brief abstract should be able to orient the viewer to your whole poster printing presentation. Take note that it is brief. Always remember that your poster is not a journal or a thesis paper. It should be able to tell your viewers what to expect in not so many words.

3 - Provide content in a story-like fashion. Tell your research as if you have a story to convey. Just like a tale, plan your content to unfold in every information you impart such as your context, your results and analysis, and the importance of your research.

4 - As much as possible, use visual images and bulleted outlines to explain a point. Your viewers would appreciate a more visual presentation, rather than a wordy explanation. Hence, graphs and tables should be used to prove a point. But make sure that your viewers would be able to interpret them easily.


Finally, always provide a smooth and clear flow
to your poster printing presentation. It won’t be any use to you if your viewers have a hard time following your poster’s sequence. In addition, you have to remember to create your poster printing pieces that even the common man can understand what you’re trying to say. You’re goal is to reach as many people as you can anyway, so try to make it as simple and as easy to understand as possible.

Source: www.goarticles.com

Do You Ever Give PowerPoint Presentations? Use Your N95!


This is not just for N95, but it is a great tool for people who have to give PowerPoint presentations.
PhonePoint is the professional wireless presentation tool.

It has been designed from the ground up as a tool for presenters; slowly fine tuned with feedback from these professionals, people for whom presentations play an essential role in their job.

PhonePoint

Whether an occasional PowerPoint user or, if indeed, presentations are a critical part of your job, PhonePoint will give you a competitive and polished edge when delivering PowerPoint presentations. With PhonePoint you can concentrate upon just the presentation and the audience, leaving the PC well alone.

Compatible Devices:

Nokia N93, Nokia N90, Nokia N92, Nokia N-Gage QD, Nokia N95, Nokia N76, Nokia N73, Nokia N72, Nokia N77, Nokia N75, Nokia N71, Nokia N91, Nokia N93i, Nokia N-Gage, Nokia N70, Nokia N80

Features:

  • PhonePoint allows you, remotely from your phone, to move Forward, Backward and Restart your presentation.
  • Seamless Bluetooth Integration (support for the Toshiba, Widcomm, BlueSoleil, Microsoft and other common bluetooth stacks).
  • No user configuration - works right out of the box! Direct access to the bluetooth stack, no slow browsing-for bluetooth devices or time spent attempting to connect-to a Bluetooth device - it just works!
  • Ideal for presentations using a projector - freeing you up to stand next to your presentation. No more sneaky change-slide hand signals to a colleague positioned next to the PC.
  • Large and Clear display of the Current Slide’s Title and Position.
  • Keep your presentation on track - counters display the time spent on the current slide and for the total presentation.
  • Quickly (and Privately) access the Speaker Notes for the Current Slide on the phone’s screen.
  • Supports all Series60 phones in their native screen resolutions.
  • Remotely play (and stop) video and audio embedded within slides.
  • Works wirelessly up to 10 meters - 30 foot from your PC.
  • Fully compatible with Windows Vista and Office 2007.
  • Source: www.n95blog.com

Making An Effective Poster Presentation

Poster printing presentations are very much an integral part of any research undertaking because you need to communicate to your colleagues the result of what you have done and interact with them.


In any professional association meetings
, poster printing sessions have become very significant with its purpose of providing the presenters a way to connect with their audience and relay their research findings. This has become such a way of life in any organizational meetings in disciplines of the sciences that poster printing sessions are made more often than the presentation of any research paper. It seems that the science community has become more acceptable of making research studies more flexible and easier to understand.

However, a poster printing presentation is certainly neither a thesis nor a dissertation. As much as you want to put everything you have to say in your poster printing presentation, space is limited to such that it makes for a much better viewing than reading. Keep in mind that viewers of your poster printing presentation would be averse to lengthy reading, and would only be inspecting what you have done. Your lengthy explanation would be much better off in a journal or thesis that you can provide after.

Therefore, keeping it simple without sacrificing the information contained within would get you more viewers than any other kind of poster printing presentation. Here are a few suggestions that can help you come up with an effective poster printing presentation for your research:

1 - Your title should be brief and descriptive. With just one look, your viewers should be able to deduce what you have in store for them. Your title has a very solid role to play in your poster printing presentation. It’s either your title grab your viewers’ attention or they simply decide that they are not interested.

2 - A brief abstract should be able to orient the viewer to your whole poster printing presentation. Take note that it is brief. Always remember that your poster is not a journal or a thesis paper. It should be able to tell your viewers what to expect in not so many words.

3 - Provide content in a story-like fashion. Tell your research as if you have a story to convey. Just like a tale, plan your content to unfold in every information you impart such as your context, your results and analysis, and the importance of your research.

4 - As much as possible, use visual images and bulleted outlines to explain a point. Your viewers would appreciate a more visual presentation, rather than a wordy explanation. Hence, graphs and tables should be used to prove a point. But make sure that your viewers would be able to interpret them easily.

Finally, always provide a smooth and clear flow to your poster printing presentation. It won’t be any use to you if your viewers have a hard time following your poster’s sequence. In addition, you have to remember to create your poster printing pieces that even the common man can understand what you’re trying to say. You’re goal is to reach as many people as you can anyway, so try to make it as simple and as easy to understand as possible.

Source: www.goarticles.com

Powerless in the Face of PowerPoint?

We love to hate PowerPoint, as Abhay Padgaonkar observes over at MarketingProfs. But is it PowerPoint, or just people using it badly? Does PowerPoint deserve more ire than, say, Word (used to create unreadable documents) or Excel (used to create meaningless spreadsheets)?

Padgaonkar says:

Remember, PowerPoint is simply a means to an end. It is only a visual aid. Don’t hide behind it and don’t let it overshadow the protagonist—the speaker.

Indeed. The article includes some good tips on using PowerPoint, but there’s just one overarching point I’d make: the PowerPoint presentation should be the last thing you do. You should have thought things through, written your supporting documents, and crunched your numbers before you use PowerPoint to create visual aids that will help you tell the story.

PowerPoint won’t tell the story itself, unless the story is so simplistic and dull that nobody should be wasting their time sitting in front of you to hear it. And this is why I think PowerPoint, the program, does deserve its bad reputation.

The idea of it is fine: a tool for creating slides and showing them to people. The problem is that Microsoft, in its usual fashion, then tarted it up with templates and formatting and tools that are supposed to help you create the content. And they are horrible, because they are designed to make you stupid about your content.

I once had a boss who did kick-ass presentations with PowerPoint. Of course, his slides usually consisted of a headline or a few words and images that illustrated his point. Without him speaking, they would be meaningless. With him speaking, they made you remember what he was saying and pick out the key points of his presentation.

To make PowerPoint a useful program, I recommend deleting every template that comes with it. When you are ready to work on your presentation, take out a piece of paper and pen and start sketching what you’d like it to be. Only when you have some ideas down should you fire up PowerPoint and get to work.

Otherwise, PowerPoint will be doing the thinking for you. And you know what? It’s not nearly as smart as you are.
Source: www.opinionatedmarketers.blogspot.com